Working the Watch: Walking the Wainwright’s

I have had my Garmin Forerunner 210 for two years now. Before that, I had the Garmin Forerunner 305. I loved that watch but it is now lovingly used by the other half. I admit, it does look better on him. Generally, the only functions I use on my watch are the Start/ Stop and Lap buttons. I know how to set up the auto laps, but everything else has just been wasted on me. Until now. After a rubbish run on the Sunday following the Great North Run, I didn’t feel up for a track session on the Tuesday. Plus, it was hot <insert other excuses here>.

Instead, I decided it was an ideal opportunity to try out the ‘Interval’ function on my Garmin. By doing intervals on my own I could, in theory, give myself an easier time and quit if my legs weren’t feeling it. Embarrassingly easy to set up, I built up an interval session of 2 minutes ‘fast’ and 3 minutes slow repeated 10 times.

After a quick warm up, I started the interval session on a route round Waterside. The beeps indicating a change from a ‘fast’ pace to a recovery were easily distinguishable and I began cursing them as the 2 minute hard section seemed intolerably long, while the 3 minute recovery passed by in a blur. It was also guaranteed that a fast interval would begin at the bottom of a hill! Typical! There were several points during this run where I seriously did think about quitting the session and having a slow jog home. However, I kept going and, by the time I reached my 7th rep, I was almost finished anyway so I couldn’t quit! The session finished quarter of a mile from home and it was nice to be able to reduce to a shuffle and cool down before arriving back home. I was really happy that I’d completed the session and not wimped out. I will try to add more of these runs into my training week as it can be too easy to get stuck at one pace and plod along.

intervals

Thursday’s club session felt tough. Really tough. Legs still heavy from Tuesday’s intervals insanity, it felt like a real effort to keep moving forwards! It always seems like such a long slog up Wigton Road. The rest of the route didn’t feel too arduous but my legs felt it as the pace quickened for the final mile. I was pleased, and surprised, that I’d managed to average 8’35 min/mile. Not too shabby for me!

Following a hard, but lovely, 6 mile run with Ali on a warm Sunday morning, I headed off with the family to Souther Fell so that our youngest, Thea, could bag her 6th Wainwright. It was beautiful as we arrived in Mungrisdale ready to begin our hike. Walking along a quiet track, it wasn’t long before we left the track behind and began the steep climb up the side. The views as we ascended were amazing. Despite its relatively small size, the panoramic views that Souther Fell offers are breathtaking. We walked along the whole ridge, the wind had grown in intensity as we’d climbed and we found somewhere relatively sheltered to enjoy our picnic. The girls’ reward for their awesome efforts!

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Views of Blencathra and Bannerdale Crags

Views of Blencathra and Bannerdale Crags

The Tongue

The Tongue

IMG_6439IMG_6473After the tough climb up, the girls enjoyed the descent and were full of enthusiasm as we reached the bottom. We are so lucky being able to access such beautiful places that are only a short drive away. Getting away from the hustle and bustle and enjoying being out in the fresh air in our beautiful corner of England is priceless.

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One Response to Working the Watch: Walking the Wainwright’s

  1. plumpetals says:

    I like the idea of setting up an interval timer. I’m running on a treadmill at the moment and I really don’t like those wasted seconds between going from my jog to a sprint. An interval timer on the treadmill would be such a great solution!

    Lovely photos! How wonderful to have such stunning scenery around you.

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